Is a Fungal Infection Behind Your Psoriasis?

Sufferers of psoriasis know that this difficult-to-treat skin and joint condition can leave many people perplexed as to the best way to address it. Most people start by eliminating toxic chemical laundry products, synthetic fabrics, inflammation-causing and chemical-laced foods, and attempt to uncover food sensitivities, all of which are excellent approaches. But research suggests there may also be another culprit behind the red and sometimes scaly skin patches, itching or burning, swollen and stiff joints, and dry skin that is prone to cracking and bleeding.

A meta analysis from earlier this year found that people with psoriasis were more likely to have a Candida infection than those who don’t have the condition, suggesting the fungal infection and psoriasis are linked. In the study, published in the medical journal Mediators of Inflammation, researchers attempted to determine the prevalence of various species of Candida fungi in people suffering from psoriasis compared to those without the condition. The study concluded that people with psoriasis had increased levels of Candida colonization.

Not only does the study shed light on possible causal factors for the condition, it provides direction for future studies to identify possible treatments. Additionally, it also reveals an issue with some of the drug treatments that can significantly reduce the body’s antifungal immune response, leaving sufferers of the condition with potentially worse symptoms down the road.

Candida is commonly referred to as a yeast infection but it is actually a type of fungus. While we often think of it as being exclusively linked to vaginal infections, both men and women can suffer from Candida infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which can also travel to other parts of the body. There are many species of fungi that are collectively known as Candida.

What Causes Candida Infections?

There are many causal factors for candida infections including:  alcohol consumption; sugar consumption; the use of antacids, antibiotics or birth control pills; chlorinated water; consumption of foods that contain antibiotics or synthetic hormones (that typically includes non-organic dairy products, poultry or meat), sexual contact with an infected person, poor diet and chronic stress. Additionally, health conditions like low thyroid function or diabetes can make a person vulnerable to candida infections.

Signs You May Have a Candida Infection

  • Acne
  • Allergies
  • Bladder infections
  • Bloating and gas
  • Brain fog or difficulty concentrating
  • Chemical sensitivities
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea or Constipation
  • Eczema
  • Endometriosis
  • Fatigue
  • Fibroids
  • Intestinal cramps
  • Menopausal symptoms
  • PMS
  • Psoriasis
  • Sweet cravings
  • Vaginal yeast infections
  • Weight gain

 

Natural Ways to Treat a Candida Infection

Anything that boosts the immune system can be helpful in the treatment of candida infections, but some remedies are better than others. Of course, eating more garlic and onions, particularly raw, can be helpful. It’s also imperative to remove sugar from your diet as candida fungi thrive on sugar. Additionally, here are some of the research-proven herbs that can help kill Candida infections:

Chamomile

According research published in the Indian Journal of Dentistry, a high-potency extract of German chamomile effectively killed Candida fungal infections.

Ginseng

An animal study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology found that ingestion of North American ginseng significantly reduced Candida albicans infection. There are different types of ginseng so be sure to select North American ginseng.

Thyme

Thyme has a long history of use as an antifungal agent. Research in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine confirms that, not only is thyme is effective against fungi, it even works against drug-resistant strains of Candida fungi.

These herbs are readily available in tincture form. A standard dose is 30 drops 3 times daily, but you should follow package instructions. Herbal tinctures are available in most health food stores. Consult your health care practitioner prior to use.

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Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM is the publisher of the free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News, the Cultured Cook, co-founder of BestPlaceinCanada, and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include: Cancer-Proof: All Natural Solutions for Cancer Prevention and HealingFollow her work.

 

44 comments

Danuta W
Danuta W16 days ago

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Janis K
Janis K16 days ago

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Salla T
Salla Tuu17 days ago

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Chad Anderson
Chad Anderson18 days ago

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Justin M
Justin M18 days ago

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Jan K
Jan K18 days ago

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Tabot T
Tabot T18 days ago

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danii p
danii p18 days ago

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danii p
danii p18 days ago

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danii p
danii p18 days ago

Thank you for sharing

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