Is Dog Fighting More Common Than You Think?

Although I’ve written about my objection to other forms of animal abuse, there is no animal cruelty worse than dog fighting. Even though dog fighting is a felony in all 50 U.S. States, it is still in existence in many parts of the U.S., dating back to the 1750s.

The ASPCA reports the estimated number of people involved in dog fighting is in the tens of thousands, based on animals entering shelters with evidence of fighting and on reports in underground dog fighting publications.

Fighting dogs that don’t perform are killed, often inhumanely, or abandoned.

The ASPCA reports that fighting dogs are raised in isolation, spending most of their stressed lives on short, heavy chains. They are not ever socialized with people. They are starved and fed drugs, including anabolic steroids, to build muscle mass. If they want dinner, they have to fight. Their ears and tails are cropped close to their body to avoid revealing their body language signals and limit their opponents ability to grab their tail or ears. Even worse, the cropping is done with inhumane techniques. This is the life of a dog that is part of a dog fighting ring.

April 8 is National Dog Fighting Awareness Day. The goal is to educate people on the prevalence of dog fighting in the U.S., reveal little-known truths about the blood sport and encourage animal lovers nationwide to take action against one of the most brutal forms of animal cruelty.

People often think dog fighting is restricted to certain parts of the country, is a rare activity and that participants in this inhumane sport make up a very small demographic of American culture. None of those statements are true.

What happens in a dog fight?
Some fights are as organized for spectators as the famous Ali vs. Frazier fight in 1971. They usually take place in a pit (so the dogs can’t get out) between 14 and 20 square feet. Dogs are often weighed to make sure they are equal opponents. Dogs are released from opposite corners at the start of the fight and meet in the middle. ASPCA Reports, “The dogs grab and shake to inflict maximal damage. Handlers are not permitted to touch the dogs except when told to do so by the referee.”

What breed of dogs are used for fighting?
Sadly, the American Pit Bull Terrier is the preferred dog of choice in the U.S., further destroying the reputation of this sweet, loyal breed who aims to please and is so devoted to their human caretakers. Other breeds are often brought in as bait dogs to help train the fighting dogs.

Who gets involved in dog fights and why?
Greed plays a big part. It is customary for $20,000 to $30,000 to exchange hands during a single fight. And fighters pay top dollar for pups bred from a successful canine fighter. Drug dealers are commonly part of a dog fighting ring. Other people enjoy the sadistic source of entertainment.

Is it legal to attend a dog fight?
No. As part of the Farm Bill, in 2014 the Animal Fighting Spectator Prohibition Act made it a federal offense to attend an animal fight in the U.S. Bringing a child under the age of 16 imposes additional penalties.

If you want to help educate others in the truths about dog fighting, please share this post with others. A little education can go a long way.

101 comments

Mike R
Mike R19 days ago

Thanks

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Mike R
Mike R19 days ago

Thanks

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Mike R
Mike R24 days ago

Thanks

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Mike R
Mike R24 days ago

Thanks

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Siyus Copetallus
Siyus C2 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Quanta Kiran
Quanta Kiran2 years ago

get rid of these creeps already!

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Nina S.
Nina S2 years ago

tyfs

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Jim Ven
Jim Ven2 years ago

thanks for the article.

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Shirley S.
Shirley S2 years ago

DOB THEM IN TO THE AUTHORITIES ! PLEASE !

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Joy T.
Joy T2 years ago

So tremendously aggravating! :(

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