Natural Treatments for Morning Sickness

Nausea and vomiting are common during pregnancy, affecting 70 to 85 percent of women worldwide—but not in all countries. Population groups that eat more plant-based diets tend to have little or no nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. In fact, on a nationwide basis, the lowest reported rates in the world are in India at only 35 percent.

Sometimes symptoms are so severe it can become life threatening, a condition known as hyperemesis gravidarum. Each year more than 50,000 pregnant women are hospitalized for this condition. What can we do other than reduce our intake of saturated fat—for example, cutting the odds five-fold by cutting out one daily cheeseburger’s worth?

The “best available evidence suggests that ginger is a safe and effective treatment for PNV,” pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting. The recommended dose is a gram of powdered ginger a day, which is about a half-teaspoon or equivalent to about a full teaspoon of grated fresh ginger or four cups of ginger tea. The maximum recommended daily dose is four grams, no more than about two teaspoons of powdered ginger a day.

“[C]annabis was rated as extremely effective or effective by 92 percent” of the pregnant women who used it for morning sickness, but cannabis use during pregnancy may be regarded as potentially harmful to the developing fetus. This is not your mother’s marijuana. “Today’s marijuana is 6 to 7 times more potent than in the 1970s” and may cause problems for both the developing fetus and then later for the developing child. The bottom line is that pregnant and breastfeeding cannabis users should be “advised to either decrease or where possible cease cannabis use entirely.”

What do they mean by “where possible”? People don’t realize how bad it can get. One woman observed that during her second pregnancy, “I was throwing up first the acid in my stomach, which is yellow, then it’s orange because it’s the outer layer, and then you get to the green bile which is [from] your intestines. Then once you’re past that, you go straight blood.” Indeed, hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to such violent vomiting that you can rupture your esophagus, bleed into your eyes, go blind, or become comatose. So, there are certain circumstances in which cannabis could be a lifesaver for both the mother and the baby, as women with this condition sometimes understandably choose to terminate otherwise wanted pregnancies.

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations—2015: Food as Medicine: Preventing and Treating the Most Dreaded Diseases with Diet, and my latest, 2016: How Not to Die: The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, and Reversing Our Top 15 Killers.

Related at Care2

62 comments

Jack Y
Jack Y2 months ago

thanks

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Jack Y
Jack Y2 months ago

thanks

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John J
John J2 months ago

thanks for sharing

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John J
John J2 months ago

thanks for sharing

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Paulo R
Paulo R5 months ago

ty

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Paulo R
Paulo R5 months ago

ty

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Mike R
Mike R5 months ago

Thanks

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Angela J
Angela J5 months ago

Thanks

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Amanda M
Amanda M5 months ago

Chrissie R, you're one of the lucky ones-I had morning sickness so bad during my second pregnancy that I probably gave Kate Middleton a run for the money! 24/7 straight nausea and vomiting, and ginger ale and saltines did NOTHING for it! I wasn't crazy about either one to begin with, and now I never want to see saltines and ginger ale again as long as I live! With my older daughter, I had regular morning sickness-it was only in the mornings, and I felt human again by 10:30. With my second, it was constant for the first three months. And I tried EVERYTHING-mint tea, ginger, ginger ale/saltines, you name it. I even tried that electronic wristband that gives you little zaps at your pressure point. It's supposed to work for motion and morning sickness, but I had that thing dialed up to 4 out of 5 and all it did was make my hand numb. Which is another reason we stopped at 2 kids-I figured with my luck I'd have hyperemesis gravidarum with the third, and I didn't have the time or support system to be hospitalized for that long!

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Daniela M
Daniela M5 months ago

ty

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