New Research May Help ‘Turn Off’ Celiac Disease

In America, millions of people suffer from Celiac disease, a chronic condition in which the gluten protein causes an inflammatory reaction†in the small intestine. It can cause all sorts of unpleasantries,†from diarrhea, flatulence and abdominal pain to irritability, anemia and more. And the only treatment is to completely avoid gluten for the rest of one’s life. But that life sentence might†have a†chance at†getting a scientific commutation.

Scientists have discovered†an intestinal protein that supports the metabolization of gluten in the body, and it has an on/off switch. Currently, scientists have a relatively poor understanding of this intestinal protein, known as TG2, but they know one thing: it can be turned on and off with the help of a certain enzyme. A healthy human small intestine contains a lot of TG2, but it is generally all inactive, which has led scientists to wonder What turns TG2 off? Would deactivating TG2 allow Celiacs to consume wheat and follow a less restrictive diet? † ††

When a person with Celiac disease consumes gluten, the body launches an intensive immune assault against the protein.†This immune response hits the fan when gluten is modified by the TG2 protein in the gut. The body begins attacking with full †force, but what if TG2 didn’t turn on? Could a person with Celiac theoretically consume bread, pasta and pizza again?

It seems that TG2 is activated when its disulfide bond is broken, and scientists have discovered an enzyme that does this. Itís called ERp57, and it is mainly responsible for folding proteins inside of a cell. Why it drifts outside the cell in those with Celiac to activate TG2 and cause the body to attack gluten is still poorly understood. The specific chemistry behind the reaction is actually very unique and will require a lot more research before scientists can claim a solid understanding of the process.

Research is currently only being conducted†on cells outside the body.†Human research/treatment is still far off in the future. But developing therapies that could switch off the TG2 protein presents a promising avenue of treatment for millions of Celiac sufferers everywhere. There is currently little to be done for Celiac sufferers, other than a fervent†abstinence from gluten. For those who feel bound by their restrictive diet, this is heartening news for sure.

What do you think? If you have Celiac, would you take a drug if it meant a significantly less restrictive diet for the rest of your life? Share your thoughts below. †

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65 comments

Cindy S
Cindy Smith2 months ago

thanks

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William C
William C3 months ago

Thank you.

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Mike R
Mike R3 months ago

Thanks

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Mike R
Mike R3 months ago

Thanks

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W. C
W. C3 months ago

Thank you.

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Angela K
Angela K4 months ago

noted

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Jerome S
Jerome S4 months ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S4 months ago

thanks

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Mike R
Mike R5 months ago

Thanks

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Rosslyn O
Rosslyn O5 months ago

Christine D I'd challenge that simple diagnosis/cure, because I do eat vegetarian to more vegan at home, never purchased meals, and have pro and pre biotics. I am a sever celiac disease sufferer that only need 100th of a gram, like a bread crumb to put me into hospital on drips for 12 to 24 hours. Oh and I do not suffer from a 'leaky gut' either. .. As to Jordyn's question, it still is a long way away for any relief for many of us by the looks of this and there have been other promissory cures given out that have not come into fruition yet. A pill? Well I would have to weigh that up at the time. Thanks for this information though it is a start to understanding what is happening in the gut.

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