New Study Finds Missing Link in Fibromyalgia Treatment

Many fibromyalgia sufferers live with chronic pain, fatigue and other difficult symptoms that affect their ability to perform everyday tasks. Few have any clear indicator as to the cause of their health condition, or worse, how to cure it, or at least alleviate symptoms. Knowing so little about the syndrome, the medical community has had little to offer most fibromyalgia sufferers, perhaps until now. That’s because exciting new research may shed a light on a major causal factor for the syndrome, which may help to focus attention on what will improve symptoms.

A new study published in the online medical journal PLoS One found that insulin resistance may be behind fibromyalgia. The researchers found that fibromyalgia was linked to insulin resistance, which is defined as a reduced ability by the cells to respond to the action of insulin in transporting sugar from the bloodstream into the muscles and tissues. Insulin resistance usually develops with excessive weight or obesity, as well as precludes diabetes.

The scientists found that when they regulated blood sugar levels, they were also able to treat fibromyalgia-related pain, suggesting the key to controlling symptoms, but perhaps also the overall condition, is to regulate blood sugar levels and address insulin resistance.

According to the American Chronic Pain Association, fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread pain as well as a variety of other symptoms, such as tenderness, fatigue and difficulty sleeping. These symptoms tend to vary in intensity over time. The condition can make it hard for sufferers to perform daily activities, from light household tasks to stair climbing or walking, even short distances.

Fibromyalgia is classified as a syndrome, which means it is a collection of seemingly unconnected symptoms, with the main one being unaccountable pain in the muscles (“myo” means muscle and “algia” means pain). The cause of syndromes is uncertain, but in the case of fibromyalgia, it often starts after an illness, injury or trauma. The condition affects an estimated 6 to 12 million people. While both women and men suffer from the condition, approximately 90 percent of fibromyalgia sufferers are female. It is not clear why women are more vulnerable to fibromyalgia, which now seems to be affecting as many women as diabetes.

Some of the symptoms of fibromyalgia include: widespread muscular and skeletal pain, chronic fatigue, stiffness, sleep disorders, tender points located in soft tissues. There is no laboratory test to conclude whether someone has fibromyalgia. To obtain a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, doctors determine whether people have 11 of the 18 possible tender points that characterize the condition, and have had chronic pain and/or fatigue for at least several months. Additionally, they rule out other conditions with similar symptoms since the symptoms of fibromyalgia often overlap with other conditions.

Effective Natural Remedies for Insulin Resistance

Ginger

Ginger can improve the body’s response to insulin. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas to help regulate blood sugar levels. Research published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine found that ginger was effective in the treatment of insulin resistance. Ginger is also a natural pain-killer, making it doubly effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Add finely-chopped fresh ginger to soups, curries or brew a batch of ginger tea with it. To do so, coarsely chop a 2-inch piece of ginger and add to a quart of water. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and cover, allowing to simmer for at least 45 minutes. Strain off the ginger pieces and add a touch of stevia to sweeten, if desired. Drink a few cups daily.

Cilantro

A Moroccan study found that when cilantro was added to the diets of animals, it improved or normalized many metabolic symptoms of diabetes, including lowering high blood sugars, suggesting it may also be effective in the treatment of insulin resistance.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon has been used by herbalists for many years for the regulation of blood sugar and to deal with insulin resistance. Research in the journal Lipids in Health and Disease found that cinnamon reduces high blood sugar levels and may help regulate other related symptoms.

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Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM shares her food growing, cooking, preserving, and other food self-sufficiency adventures at FoodHouseProject.com. She is the publisher of the free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include: The Cultured Cook: Delicious Fermented Foods with Probiotics to Knock Out Inflammation, Boost Gut Health, Lose Weight & Extend Your Life. Follow her work.

 

56 comments

Lizzy O
Past Member 23 days ago

noted many thanks

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Jan S
Jacob S23 days ago

thank you for sharing

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hELEN h
hELEN hEARFIELD24 days ago

tyfs

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Roxana Saez
Roxana Saez26 days ago

TYFS

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Andrea S
Andrea S26 days ago

thank u!

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Toni W
Toni W27 days ago

TYFS

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Toni W
Toni W27 days ago

TYFS

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Gino C
Gabriel C27 days ago

Thanks

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Carole R
Carole R27 days ago

I have fibromyalgia and this makes a lot of sense.

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