There May Soon Be a Way to Reverse Memory Loss

More than 16 million American adults live with cognitive impairment or decline, and many more suffer from other forms of neurodegeneration. Mental decline is a painful experience for those afflicted and their loved ones, but the worst part about cognitive issues like memory decline is that, once the issues start, they are irreversible—or so we thought.

Memory loss may not be as permanent as we once believed. In a recent study from Northwestern University, researchers found a way to drastically improve memory function in those with memory loss.

How? By applying electromagnetic pulses directly to the memory center of the brain.

How the Memory Loss Study Worked

Researchers started by giving participants a basic memory test. Younger adults with healthy memory average a rate of 55 percent correct, whereas the older adults with memory degeneration only scored 40 percent.

Afterwards, the researchers applied electromagnetic pulses to participants’ brains for 20 minutes a day for five days. On the sixth day, participants took the test again.

This time, the older adults scored as well as the younger ones! The pulses were able to reactivate their memory centers and help them perform more highly.

Of course, this won’t help you recover lost memories, per se, and who knows how long the effects last. And okay, yes, more research is definitely needed before older adults can sign up for a memory boost. But it’s reassuring to know that it may someday be possible to reverse memory loss!

Until then, it’s important to take precautions to take care of your memory the old fashioned way. Here are three of the best ways, approved by science.

Ways to Prevent Memory Loss

Brainy carrot "sparks" comes from with Broccoli that is shaped like a human brain!

1. Eat for your brain.

Eating wholesome, antioxidant-rich foods—like blueberries, turmeric, broccoli and pumpkin seeds—is like superfuel for your brain. And don’t forget fatty nuts! A 2014 review showed that nuts can improve overall cognition and prevent the onset of cognitive decline.

Oh, and more good news: studies have shown that coffee has a protective effect on the brain, too. When consumed in moderation over the long-term, it is even associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s.

With so many delicious, nourishing options, there’s no reason not to choose foods that feed your brain.

2. Exercise.

Regular physical activity actually changes the chemistry of the brain to improve memory and overall cognition.

Most immediately, a regular workout significantly reduces brain fog, which becomes increasingly present with age. Exercise also improves mood, sleep and stress levels, all of which have indirect brain benefits.

Being active also directly stimulates the health of brain cells, reduces inflammation and increases blood flow to the brain. It’s like a high intensity recharge!

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3. Find purpose in your life.

Believe it or not, having a sense of purpose in your life has a huge impact on brain health. It strengthens neural connections and challenges the brain, keeping it active and engaged. It’s even better for your brain than reading books and doing puzzles, although those are valuable, too.

Don’t know your purpose? Try journaling and venturing into new activities. You never know what might stick! Your brain will thank you.

Images via Getty

50 comments

Jeanne Rogers
Jeanne R16 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne Rogers
Jeanne R16 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Sue Magee
Sue Magee26 days ago

I think I have already commented on this already but thank you for sharing this list - expected more things to do though!

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R29 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R29 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Val P
Val P29 days ago

thanks

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Ruth S
Ruth S29 days ago

Thanks.

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Ruth S
Ruth S29 days ago

Thanks.

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Mike R
Mike R29 days ago

Thanks

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Roxana S
Roxana Saezabout a month ago

TYFS

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