Umeboshi, A Little Plum With Big Health Benefits

It’s the weekend—time to go celebrate the end of another work week. But if your TGIF turns into a Saturday morning hangover, try reaching for umeboshi instead of an aspirin.

No, umeboshi isn’t a new pill or tonic. If you haven’t heard of these little pickled fruits before, it’s time to get acquainted. Their name translates to “Japanese salt plums,” and they may pucker you up at first, but they’re completely crave-worthy and come with some unique health benefits. Their addictive salty-sour flavor comes from the pickling process, which combines the green ume fruit (a relative of the apricot and plum) with purple shiso leaves and plenty of salt.

These zingy pickles have been popular in Japan for hundreds of years. Families traditionally pickled their own umeboshi, bringing their own unique recipe to each batch. Fortunately, these days you don’t have to pickle your own ume fruit—they’re catching on in the states.

That pucker-inducing flavor is a result of the citric acid that naturally develops during fermentation. Its citric acid makes umeboshi a great way to kick start the day: The tangy, tart zing is a simple way to wake you—and your taste buds—on those days when you just can’t seem to get going. Citric acid will also help see you through the day by helping fight fatigue.

But there’s more to umeboshi than just its sour taste—this plum also has a list of health benefits a mile long. Since the early days of umeboshi, the little pickle has been known for its restorative powers.

For one thing, umeboshi could help you recover from that painful hangover. Although it may not sound appealing the moment you open your eyes, this knockout-punch of a pickle may be just what the doctor ordered. It’s a good source of electrolytes, like sodium and potassium, which help fight nausea and dizziness.

Umeboshi has also been used in Japanese culture as an antiseptic and antibiotic. It’s a popular treatment for stomach ailments of all kinds, from constipation to diarrhea. Plus, its nausea-fighting abilities make umeboshi useful in dealing with motion and morning sickness. Though there isn’t much scientific literature to back up these claims,  it’s still thought of as a powerful preventative—think “an umeboshi a day keeps the doctor away.”

As a condiment or seasoning, umeboshi makes a great addition to rice, pasta, or veggies—like in this grilled corn with umeboshi butter recipe. A cut up umeboshi, a splash of umeboshi vinegar or a little umeboshi paste gives a powerful, fruity tang to marinades and salad dressings, like this citrus umeboshi vinaigrette.

Written by Kathryn Bloxsom, this post originally appeared on ThriveMarket

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Photo Credit: WikiCommons

123 comments

Jan K
Jan K5 days ago

thanks for sharing

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Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus3 years ago

Thank you for sharing

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Angela Malafouris

I had no idea what umeboshi was, also I thought it had a funny name, now I appreciate it more!

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Sarah Hill
Sarah Hill3 years ago

thanks

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Dimitris Dallis
Past Member 3 years ago

In the past they abolish democracy with tanks.
Now they do it with banks :)

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Shirley P.
Shirley P3 years ago

Thanks for reminding me of this beneficial food, used to use it, got away from it, but it is time to include it again in my diet.

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Marlyse g.
Marlyse G3 years ago

Umeboshi concentrate, now named UME CONCENTRATE you can find it in Europe at Terra Nova in the NL (www terranova com). I'm used to take it before sleep since over a decade as alkaliser.

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STEFANIE RACKS
STEFANIE RACKS3 years ago

THANKS FOR SHARING I'LL HAVE TO TRY UMEBOSHI.

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claudia S.
Claudia S3 years ago

Thank you for sharing! :-)

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Mukesh Ramteke
Mukesh Ramteke3 years ago

ty

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