Vitamin Deficiency Linked to Weight Gain and Obesity

There is more reason than ever now to eat a nutritionally-balanced diet. According to research from scientists at the University of Queensland presented in the Journal of Nutrition, certain vitamin deficiencies are linked to weight gain and obesity. In the study, researchers assessed 1131 Mexican-American children to determine whether a deficiency in specific B complex vitamins was linked to an increase in fat gain, specifically.

In addition to taking blood samples to determine nutritional status of various B vitamins, the researchers also took body mass index (BMI), and assessed the amount of abdominal fat and the total amount of body fat.

Their research found that those children with the lowest blood levels of thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), folate (vitamin B9), and B12 (cobalamin) had the highest amount of bodily fat, suggesting a link between deficiencies of these B complex vitamins in weight gain and fat storage. While the exact mechanism at work is not yet clear, the researchers believe that these B-complex vitamins play an important role in fat burning and metabolism.

Because all these vitamins are water-soluble, meaning that they are not stored in the body and must be eaten on a daily basis to ensure adequate amounts, it is easy to become deficient if a person is not eating foods high in these essential nutrients. To help reduce the incidence of deficiency, here are some of the best food sources for each of these vitamins:

Thiamin (Vitamin B1): Sunflower seeds, navy beans, black beans, barley, dried peas, green peas, lentils, pinto beans, lima beans and oats.

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): Soybeans (choose only organic soybeans since soy is a heavily genetically-modified crop), spinach, beet greens, tempeh, yogurt, crimini mushrooms, eggs, asparagus, almonds and turkey.

Folate (Vitamin B9): Lentils, pinto beans, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), asparagus, spinach, navy beans, black beans, kidney beans, turnip greens, and broccoli.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin): Sardines, salmon, tuna, cod, lamb, scallops, shrimp, beef and yogurt. While most of the richest sources of vitamin B12 are not vegetarian, there are some good vegan sources of vitamin B12 as well, including: spirulina, chlorella, sprouts, and some fermented foods like dairy-free yogurt. Some packaged foods are also fortified with vitamin B12.

It is also possible to take a high-quality B-complex supplement devoid of artificial colors, fillers, or preservatives. Most supplements come in a 50 or 100 milligram amount.  Children need less than adults so it is best to choose a product that is child-specific if they are intended for someone twelve or under.  Note: Some B-complex vitamins like folate and B12 are actually measured in micrograms. So in a 100 milligram B-complex supplement you will likely find 100 micrograms of folate and B12, which is a sufficient dose for most people. While it is frequently beneficial to take a B-complex vitamin supplement, the B vitamins in foods tend to be better absorbed. Many vegans or vegetarians may need to supplement with a B12 vitamin since it is difficult to obtain sufficient daily amounts of this vitamin without supplementation. Having said that, it is not impossible to obtain enough B12 through food if a concerted effort is made to eat a variety of foods rich in vitamin B12 every day.

For more information about nutritional links to obesity and weight gain, consult my book 60 Seconds to Slim.

Related
How I Got Rid of Menopause Symptoms Entirely
15 Surprising Uses For Bananas
8 Homemade Alternatives to Soda

123 comments

Jeanne R
Jeanne R11 months ago

TYFS

SEND
Jeanne R
Jeanne R11 months ago

TYFS

SEND
Jeanne R
Jeanne R11 months ago

TYFS

SEND
Jeanne R
Jeanne R11 months ago

TYFS

SEND
Jeanne R
Jeanne R11 months ago

TYFS

SEND
natasha p
.11 months ago

awful

SEND
Jeanne Rogers
Jeanne R2 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

SEND
Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus3 years ago

Thank you for sharing!

SEND
Sarah Hill
Sarah Hill3 years ago

thanks

SEND
Jennifer H.
Jennifer H3 years ago

Well, Bs are a problem for me!

SEND