We’re in a Crisis Because We’re Not Moving Enough

Not getting enough exercise isn’t just an American problem—it’s a global crisis. A recent World Health Organization (WHO) report found that an astounding 1.4 BILLION people aren’t getting enough regular physical activity. The planet has a human population of around 7.6 billion, so that’s over 18 percent of the total population.

Defining ‘Enough’ Physical Activity

It’s not like the WHO has set unreasonable activity standards. It’s really not that hard to satisfy the minimum requirements for movement.

The WHO defines a healthy amount of physical activity as 2.5 hours of moderate-intense activity or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week, which works out to 15 minutes per weekday. Plus, they recommend at least two days of strength training practice.

All in all, it’s a relatively small slice of time and effort when you consider how long a week is.

But it seems like we’re moving as a population towards Wall-E levels of inactivity. Even when taking into consideration walking, bike commuting andintense physical activity at certain jobs (which don’t seem to come with the same benefits as leisure time physical activity), 32 percent of women and 23 percent of men globally don’t move enough.

And technology that makes life easier and less hands-on only makes the problem worse.

Senior woman with dog on a walk in an autumn nature.

What’s Driving Our Sedentary Lifestyle?

Interestingly, the wealthier the country, the greater the problem. According to the research, 40 percent of Americans and 36 percent of those in the UK are not moving enough to maintain good health. And in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, more than 50 percent of adults don’t meet the WHO’s minimum exercise requirements. Compare that to the mere six percent of those in Uganda and Mozambique who are too sedentary.

The more luxuries humans can afford, the more our fitness seems to collectively suffer. And it is making us incredibly unhealthy.

Getting too little exercise increases the risk for depression, cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and various cancers. These are serious diseases, but they are so easily preventable. All it takes is 30 minutes a day of brisk walking, swimming, hiking, or paddling to keep you relatively fit—especially as you age.

A good tactic is to set a couple of hours of technology-free time each day to connect with friends, reads books, and invest in exercise. These things are paramount to good health and longevity. Don’t let technology take that away.

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68 comments

Ruth S
Ruth S1 months ago

Thanks.

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Elizabeth M
Past Member 2 months ago

Noted

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Elizabeth M
Past Member 2 months ago

very good many thanks.

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Elizabeth M
Past Member 2 months ago

noted thanks for posting.

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Clare O'Beara
Clare O2 months ago

I move a lot. if you do not that is for you to realise and remedy

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Clare O'Beara
Clare O2 months ago

speak for yourself

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Justin M
Justin M2 months ago

Thanks

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Martin H
Martin H2 months ago

good reporting.

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Kathy G
Kathy G2 months ago

Thank you

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Kathy G
Kathy G2 months ago

Thank you

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