Why & How to Adopt a Turkey for Thanksgiving

I don’t eat turkey for Thanksgiving, or any other day, and I was delighted to read on Vetstreet.com additional ways to help turkeys, aside from not serving them for dinner.

Vetstreet introduced me to Farm Sanctuary’s Adopt a Turkey Project. Since 1986, they have encouraged people to save a turkey at Thanksgiving through:

1. Sponsorship that helps rescue animals and provide care for them at their sanctuaries
2. Education and advocation for turkeys and other farm animals everywhere

Do turkeys have personalities?

While they may have a bad reputation for being stupid, it turns out that couldn’t be further from the truth. Turkeys are very curious and love to be petted by humans. Dr. Drucilla Roberts has adopted a number of turkeys from Farm Sanctuary and told Vetstreet:

“They’re very friendly. They come right up to you; they’re not afraid of people. They’re very curious and vocal and not afraid of any of the other farm animals. They’re sensitive beings, they have feelings, and the personality part is very strong. We are so very happy with our turkeys.”

What will you need to adopt a turkey?

  • A completed application
  • Zoning for livestock in your area
  • Proper shelter that will keep your turkey safe from predators
  • Flooring that won’t hurt turkeys’ feet
  • Advice from a poultry veterinarian on diet and feeding procedure
  • Room in your heart for a new best friend that will be very devoted to you

Are there alternatives to adopting?

If you don’t meet the criteria for adopting, consider sponsoring a shelter turkey. The cost is only $30 and you’ll receive a certificate and information about the turkey’s personality. Better yet, you can even visit your sponsored shelter turkey.

Have you ever cared for a turkey or sponsored one? Thanks for sharing your experiences in a comment below.

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59 comments

natasha p
.10 months ago

cute!!!!!!!!!

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Jonathan Harper
Jonathan Harper4 years ago

ty

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Maureen Welch
Maureen welch4 years ago

i guess *promoting* compassion is more what i meant. But either way. If i could, i would rescue them all and quit the meat eating madness.

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Maureen Welch
Maureen welch4 years ago

This article is supporting compassion. It's sad when someone has a problem with that.

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Jonathan Harper
Jonathan Harper4 years ago

tyfi

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Danuta Watola
Danuta W4 years ago

Thank you for the article.

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Donna T.
Donna T4 years ago

thank you

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Rhonda B.
Rhonda B4 years ago

ty

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Carol P.
Carol P4 years ago

Adopting or rescuing farm animals is bad for the environment. Your taking an animal that was specifically bred for a single purpose out of the food stream and instead, have created a situation where an animal will need to be supported for the rest of its life, requiring resource be grown and transported in order to keep it alive in an unnatural environment. Adopted turkeys are NOT feeding on the same foods as they would in the wild, rather are given feed that has to be grown.

Yes, support wildlife, keep natural habitats intact, and limit your consumption. But please don't add to the problems by creating a demand for even more grossly-overbred turkeys to be produced, which is basically what this post is supporting.

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 .
.4 years ago

ty

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