Wild Rice is Healthier Than Brown and White (And More Flavorful!)

Wild rice is considered the most decadent of all the grains with its distinctive, earthy flavor. Move over brown and white rice—wild rice has an extra nutritional punch that makes it a clear winner.

Good Source of Antioxidants

We need antioxidants to help reduce the risk of several diseases, including cancer. Wild rice is very high in antioxidants according to the research at the University of Minnesota.

An analysis of 11 different samples of wild rice at the University of Manitoba, in Canada, found that it has 30 times more antioxidants than white rice.

Beneficial for the Heart

Long-term consumption of wild rice in studies had cardiovascular benefits due to its lipid-lowering properties.

Although there is little research on wild rice, 45 studies found that those who ate whole grains had less heart disease.

Reduces Plaque in Arteries

It was also found that eating at least 6 servings of whole grains a week reduced the buildup of plaque in arteries in postmenopausal women.

May Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Eating whole grains like wild rice lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes by 20–30 percent according to research. Eating whole grains is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes but eating refined grains such as white rice is associated with an increased risk according to 16 studies. 

High in Protein with Less Calories

Wild rice has 40 percent more protein and about 30 percent fewer calories than brown rice. The protein in wild rice contains all of the essential amino acids, making it a complete protein which is great for vegetarians and vegans.

Gluten-Free

It is gluten-free like brown rice, millet and quinoa. 

Wild rice growing

Wild rice growing

Nutrition

Being low in calories and high in nutrients makes wild rice a nutrient-dense food.

1 cup of cooked wild rice has 166 calories, 6.5 grams of protein, 3 grams of fiber, 13 percent of the DV for manganese, 15 percent of the DV for zinc, 13 percent of the DV for magnesium, 13 percent of the DVs for phosphorus and also small amounts of iron, potassium and selenium. For full nutrition detail go to Wild Rice Nutrition. 

How to Select

It’s best not to buy boxed wild rice mixes which are less fresh and the additives often have traces of gluten. Make sure it is organic. The best wild rice grows in Minnesota and Manitoba. Noaspa Harvest is totally certified and harvested naturally. The wild rice grown in California is mostly commercialized and processed. 

How to Store

It is low in fat, so uncooked wild rice can be kept in a dry, airtight container for years. Once it has been cooked and tightly covered it can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week and the freezer for up to six months.

Cooking Tips

It is a good nutritious substitute for potatoes, pasta or rice. You can eat it alone or add it to salads, soups, casseroles and even desserts.

Wild rice ready to be cooked

Wild rice ready to be cooked

How to Cook Wild Rice

Ingredients:
1 cup wild rice
3 cups water
1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt

Directions:

  1. Rinse the wild rice in a fine-mesh strainer and rinse with cold running water to remove unwanted hulls and dust.
  2. Put the rice in the saucepan with 3 cups of water and soak overnight. Or you can skip soaking overnight and just start cooking it.
  3. The next day, add salt and bring to a boil over high heat.
  4. Reduce heat to low and simmer/cook the rice for 50 – 60 minutes, depending on the type of wild rice you have.
  5. Cook until the rice is soft but not mushy and until most of the grains have burst open. Check the rice. It should be chewy with most of the grains burst open. It may need an extra 10 to 15 minutes.  Keep checking the rice and only cook till the grains are tender.
  6. Fluff the rice with a fork and serve, or add it to any number of dishes for a delicious, nutty taste and chewy texture.
Sweet Bell Peppers Stuffed with Wild Rice

Sweet Bell Peppers Stuffed with Wild Rice

Try these delicious Sweet Bell Peppers Stuffed with Wild Rice

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Jack Y7 months ago

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