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The Arab World's Wealthiest Nations Are Doing Next to Nothing for Syria's Refugees


World  (tags: Refugees&Relief, refugee crisis, syria, turkey, lebanon, egypt, iraq, jordan, saudi arabia, U.A.E., united arab emirates, kuwait, oman, bahrain, HumanRights, asylum seekers )

M.N.
- 1293 days ago - washingtonpost.com
As Amnesty International recently pointed out, the "six Gulf countries - Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman and Bahrain - have offered zero resettlement places to Syrian refugees." This claim was echoed by Human Rights Watch.



   

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Comments

M.N. J (18)
Saturday September 5, 2015, 1:07 pm
From the article:

"That's a shocking figure, given these countries' relative proximity to Syria, as well as the incredible resources at their disposal. As Sultan Sooud al-Qassemi, a Dubai-based political commentator, observes, these countries include some of the Arab world's largest military budgets, its highest standards of living, as well as a lengthy history -- especially in the case of the United Arab Emirates -- of welcoming immigrants from other Arab nations and turning them into citizens.

"Moreover, these countries aren't totally innocent bystanders. To varying degrees, elements within Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the U.A.E. and Kuwait have invested in the Syrian conflict, playing a conspicuous role in funding and arming a constellation of rebel and Islamist factions fighting the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad....

"Like European countries, Saudi Arabia and its neighbors also have fears over new arrivals taking jobs from citizens, and may also invoke concerns about security and terrorism. But the current gulf aid outlay for Syrian refugees, which amounts to collective donations under $1 billion (the United States has given four times that sum), seems short -- and is made all the more galling when you consider the vast sums Saudi Arabia and the U.A.E. poured into this year's war effort in Yemen, an intervention some consider a strategic blunder...."

 

M.N. J (18)
Saturday September 5, 2015, 1:09 pm
Meanwhile, as you can see on the map from ilmfeed.com, Egypt and Iraq, who have their own problems to deal with, have taken in hundreds of thousands, while Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey are truly overwhelmed.


 

Maggie D (69)
Saturday September 5, 2015, 2:40 pm
Muslims, in one of the richest countries in the world, refusing to take in Muslim refugees. More proof of how loving and benevolent Muhammad's followers are and why we should support them.
Saudi Arabia is one of the most tightly controlled governments on the planet. As an Islamic theocratic monarchy, it is the largest country in the Middle East, the home of the two holiest places in Islam, and it's ruled over absolutely by the House of Saud, which has controlled the land since its formal recognition in 1932. Some 75 percent of the government’s income comes from oil exports, and the wealth that has been generated by controlling roughly one-fourth of the world’s petroleum reserves has been leveraged to create a distinctive and prosperous society.
Islam is the state religion of Saudi Arabia, and virtually all citizens of the country are Muslim. Although no law formally forbids Saudi Arabian citizens from practicing another religion, in practice it is heavily frowned upon. The legal system of the country is based entirely on Sharia law, and the government has stated that the Holy Quran and the Sunni school of Islam are the nation’s constitution. Those caught proselytizing another faith may be arrested and imprisoned. They may even be sentenced to death.
The ruling House of Saud is a Sunni Muslim family, and Sunni Islam is the state religion of Islam. Sunnis comprise the vast majority of Muslims in Saudi Arabia, while Shiite Muslims make up a minority. Practices in contradiction of Sunni beliefs--such as the celebration of the Prophet Mohammed’s birthday--are heavily discouraged. Shiite Muslims have been targeted by the Religious Police, at times barred from taking part in the Hajj, or religious pilgrimage.
Thanks, M.N.J., I was beginning to think this wasn't going to be pointed out.
 

Maggie D (69)
Saturday September 5, 2015, 3:01 pm
I took a look at my comment and thought, "Uh oh, that could be misconstrued. I meant we were supporting the Muslims by giving $150 billion to Iran. That won't make them as rich as Saudi Arabia but I don't see them taking in any refugees either.
 

Evelyn B (63)
Sunday September 6, 2015, 2:43 am
See also The Middle East Needs To Take Care Of Its Own Refugees

Some countries already have a large long-standing refugee population (Lebanon, Jordan) which creates its own problems - and have more recently been absorbing Iraqi refugees .... and now floods of Syrians.

But the Gulf States & Saudi may donate funds, but could be doing much more. Not necessarily taking "all", but encouraging many more to come. They already have a practice of using immigrant labour ...

But there is the sectarian issue (the Shia refugees, for example, would face problems - the media has been playing it down, but the Bahraini Shia have been having a rough time since "the Arab Spring", for example ....)

From the data, there's another question NOT being asked .....
WHY have so few TRIED to go the the Gulf?
65 applications - 33 accepted ... according to UNHCR
 

Evelyn B (63)
Sunday September 6, 2015, 2:49 am
It is not that the Gulf States should take in ALL the refugees .... why should they?
Saying "Because they are Muslim" is discriminatory ..... after all, Christian countries don't take in all Eritrean refugees ....

But they could - and should - play a more active part in hosting them.
 

Evelyn B (63)
Sunday September 6, 2015, 2:59 am
Apparently, some GCC countries have accepted a few -
33
Out of 65 requests
According to UNHCR data.

What we have no data on are those who have NOT registered with UNHCR as refugees. Those who have means to live in another country ... family, friends, and find work. There are many who have NOT registered with UNHCR, so do not show up in the statistics. For many, registering with UNHCR is humiliating ...

And not all who haven't registered have great means .... some scrape by.

NB - UNHCR data don't include Palestinian refugees who have had to flee (again) - from Syria this time.
They don't come under UNHCR because UNHCR's mandate excludes them - they have to turn to UNRWA (mandated to serve Palestinian refugees .... and their mandate targets only those who fit certain criteria - primarily, family fled in 1948 & can prove it. (Some exception made for those who fled during the 6 Day War in 1967)
 

Evelyn B (63)
Sunday September 6, 2015, 8:51 am
Pope Francis has come up with a practical proposal - which could help (not only in Europe, if other religious bodies adopt the same strategy) Pope Calls for Every European Parish to Take in Refugee Family
 

Past Member (0)
Sunday September 6, 2015, 9:50 pm
Ah such is the beautiful giving culture in those pits.
 

. (0)
Monday September 7, 2015, 8:27 am
Noted & posted
 

Nicolai L (39)
Monday September 7, 2015, 9:25 am
shame on them
noted , thanks for sharing
 

Ben O (135)
Monday September 7, 2015, 9:46 am
Outrageous!
 

Louise D (44)
Monday September 7, 2015, 10:55 am
This is not even a surprise as most of the countries that are doing nothing to help the refugees are donors of Daesh and quite a few of their citizens are involved in it. If George W Bush had half a brain cell he should have put Saudi Arabia on the axis of evil.
 

Janis K (129)
Monday September 7, 2015, 11:07 am
Thanks for sharing.
 

tonia Deur (12)
Monday September 7, 2015, 12:35 pm
Pink Floyd. Money money money. Are you really surprised?
 

Birgit W (160)
Monday September 7, 2015, 1:07 pm
Thanks for sharing.
 

Past Member (0)
Monday September 7, 2015, 1:23 pm
Maggie W. is right, why aren't those countries taking in their brothers?
 

Past Member (0)
Monday September 7, 2015, 1:24 pm
Rich Arab countries could do so much, why aren't they ???
 

Charles Wallis (111)
Monday September 7, 2015, 1:26 pm
Not surprsing
 

fly bird (26)
Monday September 7, 2015, 2:55 pm
Good comments, Evelyn.

Refugees Who Could Be Us.

http://www.care2.com/news/member/312733850/3907782
 

Janet B (0)
Monday September 7, 2015, 3:34 pm
Thanks
 

Thoms B (1)
Monday September 7, 2015, 4:16 pm
Oh c'mon, what more can you expect?
 

Roslyn McBride (28)
Monday September 7, 2015, 4:44 pm
Why would that be surprising?
 

Julie W (33)
Monday September 7, 2015, 7:06 pm
These countries don't exactly have a reputation for generosity to others, so I'm not surprised.
 

Stan B (123)
Monday September 7, 2015, 8:00 pm
Don't ever expect Arabs to help other Arabs. It's not part of their culture.
As usual they cause immense problems and expect the rest of the world to sort them out.
 

M.N. J (18)
Monday September 7, 2015, 8:37 pm
I wish more of you would read the story.

Then you would be informed that Lebanon and Jordan have taken in over a million refugees each.

Refugees from Syria now make up 20 percent of the population in Lebanon, on top of the 400,000 Palestinian refugees that Lebanon has hosted for decades. The Za'atari refugee camp is now Jordan’s fourth largest city. Lebanon and Jordan were already experiencing water shortages BEFORE the crisis began.

What do you mean they don't help their own? What do you mean it's not part of their culture?

In the town of Arsal in northeast Lebanon, the 35,000 residents had already welcomed 19,000 refugees when, last November, they suddenly received an additional 20,000 refugees in less than one week who were fleeing new clashes in Syria.

Imagine that happening in your suburb, and then say, "It's not part of their culture" to help each other.
 

M.N. J (18)
Monday September 7, 2015, 8:43 pm
My point in posting this story is that there are some governments which are not fulfilling their humanitarian obligations. The Gulf States, with their huge wealth, are an obvious example.

Also among those governments which could be doing more, as pointed out in other stories, are Canada, Australia, Brazil, and the United States.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/06/opinion/sunday/the-refugee-crisis-isnt-a-european-problem.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0
 

Paul Christensen (1)
Monday September 7, 2015, 9:00 pm
The medling of the west got this ball rolling......we need to pony up as well. More so than any others on this planet. In no way shape or form have we BEGUN to do that."you reap what you sow" these words are food for thought for us in the west and those in the gulf states as well
 

Stan B (123)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 1:14 am
MNJ. Why do you think Europe is being overwhelmed by a tidal flow of Arab refugees which is going to fundamentally change the demographics of many countries and place incredible pressure on their social security systems?
I repeat. This is a problem created by Arabs and they should sort it out.
 

Evelyn B (63)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 6:28 am
MN - those comments are by a group of anti-Arab, Islamophobic pro Zionists, who damn Arabs frequently ....

They don't/ can't/ won't recognise that Israel has played its part in the destabilisation ..... But insist on classifying all Arabs as one category (associated with Muslim) .... I didn't see all Caucasians absorbing the refugees from the Bosnia/ Croatia/ Serbia debacles .... Nor expecting Senegal to absorb Rwandan refugees (although they are African) .... because those parallels wouldn't blacken the name of Arabs ...

You are absolutely right about the neighbouring countries already having hosted many thousands of Syrian refugees ... except Iraq (with its own crisis) and Israel (Heaven forfend - they might get Palestinian Syrians returning among the refugees .... and those wouldn't leave later) . And both Jordan & Lebanon have had to absorb Iraqi refugees, Palestinians forced out of Kuwait (because some of them were considered pro-Hussein at the time of the "1st" Gulf War), & Palestinian refugees since 1948 .... those not from the West Bank & East Jerusalem therefore not eligible for Jordanian nationaility in 1948, those fleeing in 1967, or just fleeing from oppression of Palestinians in Israel .... How large a population of refugees can any one country cope with? Neither Lebanon nor Jordan had developed a strong social security system before getting swamped by refugees .... Nor, had Syria, for that matter ...

The Pope's call for a few in each parish shows a way to respond far more practically .... Around the world, not only in Europe as he suggests. I'd like to see the same response from Islamic religious leaders in the GCC and other countries.

Because refugee camp cities are a vacuum - there's little opportunity to develop any self-sufficiency - only dependency on hand outs. And that is psychologically destructive. And more expensive, in the long run. Closing refugees into ghetto conditions is no answer. And camps are a form of ghetto ... better than nothing, but NOT good. No work opportunities, make-shift education, health services .... usually located in places without basic utilities so sanitation, water supplies etc are public. Hell on privacy, family life, social life .... damaging to human psyche. NGOs do their best but the context is restricting ....

Yes - the wealthier GCC should be doing more - not just giving large sums to UN & NGO agencies but facilitating some entry ...

But NOTE - the refuges are NOT trying to go there ...
Would you, unless you were sure of proper housing, water, electricity in the heat & dust of those countries? A canvas camp outside the urban areas could only be a form of hell .....
 

Thomas M (8)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 8:01 am
Those Arab nations taking 0 refugees have only one thing in mind and that is preserving their religious perfection. They will spend million and billions to kill people of other religions and 0 to preserve humanity. Meanwhile, the media rips President Obama and European leaders for not doing more and why? I would imagine the refugees do not want to go to Saudi Arabia, Iran, etc.to avoid being forced into slavery. Oh, what a wonderful region of the world in which to live.
 

James Maynard (84)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 8:03 am
Some friends and I have been asking
for weeks, why the Saudis and other
Gulf States have not done more.....
 

David B (34)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 10:24 am
you must all remember how much religion plays a role in these countries . and one muslim cult does not accept an other so that is part of it . and secondly is $$$ . the cost will be staggering . and as for all these "wonderful' christians ,what way is it easier to control the masses ? to just leave them and let them sneak in , how ever they can or take them in and count and document them ? sorry it's back to what I've said all a long . if we could disappear all religions so very many of our problems would also disappear . it causes more grief and hassel in ordinary every day life , never mind what's happening in the world now a days because of it . and it also should have been expected . you don't have war with out casualties and refugees .
 

Evelyn B (63)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 11:24 am
David - do away with religions - and you'll still get the same (mis)behaviour ... only the labels will be political movements/ parties ...

Because the real problem is the political power games played under religious guise ...
It has always been that way; it still is ...

"Laïcité" (secularism) has become a form of "religion" in France. People react to failure to respect "laïcité" in exactly the same way as certain religious groups react to those not respecting & obeying THEIR rules .....
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 5:04 pm

There’s a detailed discussion going on here under: “Urgent Petition: Ask Gulf States to Take in Refugees. Some might be interested to read?

 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Tuesday September 8, 2015, 5:07 pm

This comment just hit my eye before I left the page:

Thomas M. - if "Those Arab nations taking 0 refugees have only one thing in mind and that is preserving their religious perfection" this were true why do you think the Gulf States have built so many churches over the past decades? Only Saudi (the bed-fellow of the US) doesn't have yet officially churches although Jeddah alone has 13 unofficial prayer facilities for Christians.

 

Stan B (123)
Wednesday September 9, 2015, 1:21 am
Don't suppose there's that many synagogues there either.
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Wednesday September 9, 2015, 5:05 pm

You're funny Stan - without wanting to be, I know. Can you tell me why there should be synagogues in countries which have no Jewish population? Never had?

Did you ever ask why Israel has not one single Sikh Temple? Or Buddhist Temple?

Whereas the Arab countries which had and still have a Jewish population not only have synagogues but they also restore it mainly with the (Muslim and Christian) taxpayers money - see e.g. Egypt and the Millions they spent in restoring the Maimonides and the Ben Ezra Synagogue. The other 16 are to follow suit.

I don't recall that Israel spends one single Shekel on restoring any historic mosque ... they rather have the reputation of destroying them ... or setting the Churches ablaze as we have witnessed a few months ago.
 

Stan B (123)
Friday September 11, 2015, 1:45 am
Eleonora. You can try to spin it as much as you like but here's the reality of all those benevolent Arab countries and their Jewish populations.
In 1948 there were 851000 Jews living in Arab countries; today the number is a mere 3700.
The Jewish Nakba was much bigger than the Palestinian one.
You totally missed my point about Saudi Arabia. Of course there are no Jews there because they aren't allowed to live there. My comment about synagogues in Saudi was intended to reflect this.
Your point about Egypt restoring synagogues borders on the ridiculous. Your Egyptian buddies have managed to virtually wipe out a thriving Jewish community reducing their numbers from 75000 to < 50.
I'm sure those 50 will really enjoy the restored synagogues. They'll have almost one each!!!

Just for the record ALL minority religions are welcome in Israel including Sikhs, Buddhists, Druze and a myriad of others. Israel even allows Palestinian lunatics free access to the Al-Aksa mosque.
I certainly wouldn't and neither would your President.


 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Friday September 11, 2015, 2:47 am

Stan – I believe it’s clear to every open minded reader (you know those who are not blinded by hatred?) who puts a spin on each and every single line of those who don’t agree with the Hasbara narrative.

We’re talking in this thread about the Gulf countries which were until the late 40% purely Islamic countries. No one asked for a run-down of history of the religiously mixed Arab countries … with the added Hasbara lies.

As for Egypt – yeah, I assume that you (living in Australia) know the facts on the ground so much better than I do who lives in Egypt; makes sense …

Although your comments are off-topic I believe it's worth to give a short answer.

Before continuing to disseminate your lies re Egypt you should once get in touch with the today’s President of the JCC (Jewish Community Council) in Cairo. Madga-Tania Chehata is a beautiful and kind-hearted person who lives the true meaning of Judaism as opposed to everything poisonous which is promulgated by the Hasbaratchiks. Her newsletter (which is the only Jewish NL directly from Egypt) is uplifting and tell in every line what Judaism is truly about. Much to your chagrin you’ll not find anything useful to you or your “stories”.

She makes statements like “The sons of this community are Egyptians. We will live forever in Egypt because religion is for God and the nation is for everybody.” (African Review, April 2013). She follows in the footsteps of late Ms Carmen Weinstein ZT"L (predecessor of Maggy) who had made it her life mission to preserve their heritage.

When Nabi Daniel (FAI) and the Brooklyn-based Historical Society of Jews from Egypt attempted to lobby to remove historical arte facts and prayer books (known as “Seforim”) to the US for safekeeping Ms Weinstein ZT"L resisted their knee-jerking attempts (she called those attempts “insensitive”) when they claimed that Jews will be extinct soon. Instead, Ms Weinstein ZT"L convinced the Egyptian Government to classify all Jewish arte facts as Egyptian antiquities thereby preserving them as part of the country’s heritage and history and ensuring they would not be sold or exported!

Carmen Weinstein ZT"Lhas earned a lot of admiration when she publicly stated that “Taking the Jewish “Seforim” (books and records) out of Egypt is tantamount to saying that Egypt should demolish the pyramids and the Temple of Luxor because there are no pharaohs left.”

I don’t believe though for a moment that you’d recognize the big difference between true Judaism and Zionist Hasbara … equally I don’t expect that you can see the difference between a lie and the truth. This answer of mine is just for the records and for those members who are not blind foot soldiers of Zionist Hasbara.
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Friday September 11, 2015, 2:50 am

Stan - it goes without saying that I didn't expect an answer to my questions to you further up. You can't admit that none of those religions mentioned has a temple in Israel. Neither can you admit that any request for a license to build a Church or a Mosque within Israel proper has ever been responded to positively by the Israeli Government.
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Friday September 11, 2015, 2:53 am

Correction - it should read: "...until the late 40's purely Islamic countries..." I don't know how the % sneaked in there ...
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Friday September 11, 2015, 3:31 am

Palestinian prevents lynching of 5 lost American yeshiva students in Hebron

“A Palestinian resident of the neighborhood helped rescue them and sheltered them in his apartment.”

This story doesn’t fit your Hasbara either, Stan. Strange that it’s only to be found in Israeli Newspapers … – just imagine if it were the other way around and a Jewish family would have sheltered Palestinian Muslims … it would be splashed all over the media incl. Care2 by you and your likes. Such is Hasbara …

My apologies to you, M.N. – my intent is/was not to derail the discussion but I couldn’t resist this last comment.
 

Evelyn B (63)
Friday September 11, 2015, 5:46 am
I don't know where Stan gets his "statistics" from ..... a total of 3,700 Jews living in all the Arab countries?

I find it strange - because were he to be accurate, I have personally met more than 5% of them ... in only 5 countries. And that was just in the course of my work, with no particular effort to enter Jewish communities ....
So I would rather suspect that this figure represents a hasbara database - or perhaps figures from specific practicing religious communities rather than all Jews ... possibly only one category of Jewish religious community ....

Good point, Eleonora, about the protection provided. Such human responses are found in every conflict zone ... but it is for certain that the world media would have made a huge story out of the situation had the situation been reversed
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Friday September 11, 2015, 4:43 pm

Evelyn - those are POOHA statistics - LOL!!

As with respect to the topic and the refugee crisis I'd highly recommend to those who are interested in the deeper subject/problem of the region to read the two latest articles of Consortiumnews - they might shed a bit light on the situation in Syria at least:

Madness of Blockading Syria’s Regime
"And, as destabilizing as the current flow of Middle East refugees is to Europe, a victory by the Islamic State or Al Qaeda’s Nusra Front would open the flood gates, sending millions of desperate people pouring out of Syria and creating a political as well as humanitarian crisis. At that point, there also would be enormous pressure on President Barack Obama or his successor to mount a full-scale invasion of Syria and attempt a bloody occupation."

On Syria, Incoherence Squared
"In short order, Secretary of State John Kerry was on the phone to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov warning him that intervention “could further escalate the conflict, lead to greater loss of innocent life, increase refugee flows and risk confrontation with the anti-ISIL Coalition operating in Syria.”
All the usual suspects then piled on. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg voiced concern over the alleged escalation, as did Israel, while NATO member Bulgaria quickly bowed to U.S. pressure to bar Russian aircraft from its airspace."



 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Friday September 11, 2015, 4:45 pm

This article leads us to the root cause of the refugee problem:

How Neocons Destabilized Europe

 

Stan B (123)
Friday September 11, 2015, 5:48 pm
Here's another POOHA statistic for you. Like most civilised countries, Israel supports the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which allows individuals the right of freedom of thought,conscience and religion.
Over 20 Muslim countries have strict laws governing the religious choices of their people.
As far as I'm aware, Israel has never denied any religious group permission to build their own places of worship.
There aren't enough Sikkhs or Buddhists living in Israel to warrant the building of huge temples.
Have you visited the huge Baha'i centre in Haifa? I have.
You're skating on very thin ice, Eleonora. Hasbara overdose?
 

Evelyn B (63)
Saturday September 12, 2015, 10:14 am
Perhaps not "the" root cause - but a significant part of it, building on faultlines in earlier policies supported by the same kind of mindset ....

As far as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is concerned - Lebanon is very proud of its role in the drafting of this document. More than Israel or Australia can say ...

At the time of passing the Declaration, there were 8 abstentions - only one (Saudi Arabia) being Muslim ... and 2 who neither abstained nor voted, one (Yemen) being Muslim. Canada abstained at first, but then joined the vote for the UDHR. Most Muslim countries in existence at the time voted for - and reflect this in their constitutions..

A number of Muslim countries have personal status laws that depend on religious communities .... Lebanon, for example, has 15 different "Family Laws" (Personal Status) covering 18 recognised confessional families .... Jewish is one of these, & the Jewish community has its own Personal Status Law/ Family Law.

Reacting to a strong Western tone to the UDHR, in 2000 a number of Muslim countries ALSO signed the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam, an alternative document that says people have "freedom and right to a dignified life in accordance with the Islamic Shari'ah", without any discrimination on grounds of "race, colour, language, sex, religious belief, political affiliation, social status or other considerations".
Not quite the picture Stan's misinformation sources want to put across .....
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Saturday September 12, 2015, 1:55 pm

Evelyn - well put but unfortunately we're talking to ourselves. The irony is that a number of articles of the UDHR have their roots in Islam as Dra. María Elena Moreira (a Christian Ecuadorian Human Rights Expert) conclusively showed in her PhD Thesis "Human Rights and International Aid" which was later worked into a book. Among others she states: "Estas normas se basan en cinco principios que son los fundamentos de todo el sistema jurídico del Islam: el principio de justicia; el principio de igualdad; el principio de consulta democrática; el principio de respeto del compromiso contraído; y el principio de reciprocidad." [La Doctrina Islámica].

What I think is really interesting in Stan's comment is that "There aren't enough Sikkhs or Buddhists living in Israel to warrant the building of huge temples." Oh yes?!?!?!

But Arab countries who NEVER had a Jewish population are blamed for not building synagogues!!??

Equally he ignores that Israel has never issued a building permit for a new Church or a Mosque inside Israel proper ... well he is "not aware" ... that cuts it, I guess ... if he is not aware then it doesn't exist - LOL!! ... as opposed to the formerly 100% Muslim countries like Kuwait (10), UAE 10), Qatar (6), Bahrain (8) ... who have a number of older and newer Churches!

Incidentally - the UAE has an Armenian Church, a Seventh Day Adventist Church, a Russian Orthodox Church other than what I call "mainstream" churches. Very much (un)like Israel ... ;-)!

It's so nice to be selectively blind ... and bashing others at the same time. Q.E.D. Evelyn, ours is an exercise in futility - some people are just learn-resistant by choice!

Stay safe!

 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Saturday September 12, 2015, 1:59 pm

PS The numbers in brackets behind the Gulf country's name stands for the number of churches.
 

Stan B (123)
Saturday September 12, 2015, 11:46 pm
Evelyn. " I don't know where Stan gets his statistics from."
Perhaps you and Eleonora might find time to check out the link below and finally enlighten yourselves.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/talking/jew_refugees.html
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Sunday September 13, 2015, 12:07 am

Stan - it's not nice to add insult to injury! I've had a number of straight run-ins with Mitchell G. Bard and his Zionist propaganda and ... thank you but no thanks. Now I understand though better were you take your invaluable wisdom from ...

As Gandhi said so succinct: "I will not allow anyone to walk through my mind with their dirty shoes".

Bard doesn't just have dirty shoes, he has first and foremost a dirty mind and character. He reports historical facts (which he unfortunately can't alter) decorated with the Zionist spin. Why do you think I should repeat the brainwash of my youth and visit his site??
 

Evelyn B (63)
Sunday September 13, 2015, 9:24 am
************************************************************************ Eleonora!!
I love that Ghandi quote!!
 

Stan B (123)
Sunday September 13, 2015, 2:29 pm
I figured this link, with facts from over 20 respectable sources, might throw you, Eleonora.
The much travelled Evelyn couldn't even be bothered to check it.
You can take a horse to water..............l
 

Eleonora Oldani (37)
Sunday September 13, 2015, 4:07 pm

LOL Stan!! Zionist lies and myths don't throw me anywhere - they just amaze me in their steadfastness to disseminate half-truths (which are as good as lies) and outright hasbara. As I said - I know Mitchell and the fact that he quotes from respectable sources doesn't mean anything - what is meaningful is the spin and doctored-up "conclusions" he comes up with. THAT is the point which you understood very well and to the last dot, my dear Stan - LOL.

And it's telling that you have nothing else to say regarding the "freedom of religion" in Israel which is shown in no building permits for Churches and/or Mosques within Israel proper.

To enlighten yourself a bit but in particular this one might be of interest to you: Israel receives a “0” in the International Religious Freedom Index

This exchange has reached dead-end, Stan ... see you around ;-)!
 

Evelyn B (63)
Monday September 14, 2015, 4:09 am
Eleonora -
"respectable" is a question of judgement, isn't it? ;>) And as you say - what one does with data even from more reliable sources depends on the user's integrity! Mitchell has the same "spin" interest as those who post Islamophobic versions of stories that don't actually support the image the posters want people to believe.

Not really surprising, the news you share - thanks for the link!

"Israel in the bottom quarter of the world index of religious freedom, scoring the same as Iran, Afghanistan and Russia. Hiddush head Rabbi Uri Regev: “This index shows the growing gap between the support of most Israelis for religious freedom, and the governments’ growing surrender to fundamentalist religious politicians.”"

"President of Hiddush – Freedom of Religion for Israel, Rabbi Uri Regev, remarked “The International Religious Freedom Index puts a mirror in front of our faces, and sadly exposes how far Israel is from the enlightened democracies of the world it looks up to, and how it is slipping in the direction of radical Islamic countries. ”

According to Regev, “What leads to this shameful score is a depressing but consistent political phenomenon in Israel; political parties trading power in exchange for submission to religious coercion, ignoring the will of the overwhelming majority of Israelis and Jews throughout the world.” Regev called attention to a recent public statement by the former head of the Mossad, Efraim Halevy, who presented the growing religious radicalization of Israel as a greater threat to Israel than Ahmedinejad. “While this is the current comparative data,” stressed Regev, “we should derive hope from the fact that consistent polling of public opinion in Israel demonstrates that the clear majority of Israelis desire to see the promise for ‘Freedom of Religion and Conscience’, central to Israel’s Declaration of Independence, fully realized. 83% of Israeli Jews hold that view according to Hiddush’s 2011 Israel Religion and State Index, and 80% are dissatisfied with the government’s handling of matters of religious freedom and equality.""

I suppose that Hiddush will now be classified as a "self-hating Jew" movement?
 

Evelyn B (63)
Monday September 14, 2015, 4:21 am
Pity that the last report was for 2013 ..

(in which it is noted:
"The law recognizes the following religious communities: Eastern Orthodox, Latin (Roman Catholic), Gregorian-Armenian, Armenian-Catholic, Syrian Catholic, Chaldean (Chaldean Uniate Catholic), Greek Catholic Melkite, Maronite, Syrian Orthodox, Druze, Evangelical Episcopal, and Bahai. Other religious communities, including Muslims and major Protestant Christian denominations, have a presence in the country, but are not recognized by the government as “religious communities.” Five religious communities have applied for official recognition but their applications have been pending for years: Ethiopian Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Evangelical Lutheran Church, Evangelical Alliance of Israel, and Jehovah’s Witnesses." - See more at: http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/irf/religiousfreedom/index.htm#wrapper

Muslims and major Protestant religious populations are NOT recognised as communities .....
NO Comment!
 

Evelyn B (63)
Monday September 14, 2015, 4:23 am
"Legal and policy restrictions on religious freedom continued. Government policy supported the generally free practice of religion, although governmental and legal discrimination against non-Jews and adherents to non-Orthodox streams of Judaism continued. - See more at: http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/irf/religiousfreedom/index.htm#wrapper "

And - NB: These reports are from the US Government Department of State ......
 

Stan B (123)
Tuesday September 15, 2015, 2:55 am
MN. Apologies if I've been off topic trying in vain to educate Eleonora and Evelyn.
Here is an article on topic from Douglas Murray in the Spectator which I hope you and others will find interesting.



"I have just returned from a trip abroad to find Britain and Europe in a state of madness. I will not reflect on any connections between these events. But perhaps a reader could enlighten me as to why in recent days Britain and Europe appear to have decided that Syria’s refugees are entirely ‘our’ responsibility. Other than a generalised sense that we are all human beings, Europeans are about as far down the list of those responsible as it is possible to be.

Neither this country nor any of our European allies have made any significant intervention in Syria’s civil war. So why should Hungarians and Slovakians, Austrians and Poles be expected to bear such a significant responsibility for this?

Whenever Britain or America or Israel do have any involvement in any Islamic country we hear a very great deal about the ‘Ummah’. The OIC and the Arab League, for instance, never miss an opportunity to talk about the brotherhood and unity of the Islamic nation and how much any ‘hurt’ or offence to any part of this entity hurts and offends the whole.

Well Iran and Qatar, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Turkey and almost every other Muslim country in the Middle East have been involving themselves in the Syrian civil war for four years now. Many have sent fully-equipped armies of their own to fight intra-Islamic rivalries in the homeland of the Syrian peoples. And yet it is Europeans who are falling for the idea that because of this, it is our responsibility – not theirs – to pay for the mess they have created.

Well it seems to me that at the very least we should ask these countries ‘Where is your “Ummah” now?’ Sure, Jordan and Lebanon are grudgingly having to cope with plenty of refugees from Syria. But not one of the Gulf States – not one – has a resettlement programme for a single Syrian refugee.

And while the Iranian President lectures the Hungarians and other Europeans on our ‘shortcomings’ in this regard, how many Syrians has Iran let in? How many Syrians has Saudi Arabia given Saudi citizenship to? Neither country being uninvolved in Syria’s descent into madness…

There is much to be mulled over in all of this. But one thing I think we can all take away is that the ‘Ummah’ is a croc. There’s no such thing. It’s just a trick to beat Americans and Brits and Israelis with as and when it suits. That much is clear. But why some Europeans are falling for the idea that it is entirely our responsibility to clear up the Arab world’s self-created mess is still a question I would value readers’ opinions on."

There are some very valid comments after the article too. Hasbara free.
 

Stan B (123)
Tuesday September 15, 2015, 3:35 am
Back on topic MN.
An interesting article by Douglas Murray in the Spectator.

I have just returned from a trip abroad to find Britain and Europe in a state of madness. I will not reflect on any connections between these events. But perhaps a reader could enlighten me as to why in recent days Britain and Europe appear to have decided that Syria’s refugees are entirely ‘our’ responsibility. Other than a generalised sense that we are all human beings, Europeans are about as far down the list of those responsible as it is possible to be.

Neither this country nor any of our European allies have made any significant intervention in Syria’s civil war. So why should Hungarians and Slovakians, Austrians and Poles be expected to bear such a significant responsibility for this?

Whenever Britain or America or Israel do have any involvement in any Islamic country we hear a very great deal about the ‘Ummah’. The OIC and the Arab League, for instance, never miss an opportunity to talk about the brotherhood and unity of the Islamic nation and how much any ‘hurt’ or offence to any part of this entity hurts and offends the whole.

Well Iran and Qatar, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Turkey and almost every other Muslim country in the Middle East have been involving themselves in the Syrian civil war for four years now. Many have sent fully-equipped armies of their own to fight intra-Islamic rivalries in the homeland of the Syrian peoples. And yet it is Europeans who are falling for the idea that because of this, it is our responsibility – not theirs – to pay for the mess they have created.

Well it seems to me that at the very least we should ask these countries ‘Where is your “Ummah” now?’ Sure, Jordan and Lebanon are grudgingly having to cope with plenty of refugees from Syria. But not one of the Gulf States – not one – has a resettlement programme for a single Syrian refugee.

And while the Iranian President lectures the Hungarians and other Europeans on our ‘shortcomings’ in this regard, how many Syrians has Iran let in? How many Syrians has Saudi Arabia given Saudi citizenship to? Neither country being uninvolved in Syria’s descent into madness…

There is much to be mulled over in all of this. But one thing I think we can all take away is that the ‘Ummah’ is a croc. There’s no such thing. It’s just a trick to beat Americans and Brits and Israelis with as and when it suits. That much is clear. But why some Europeans are falling for the idea that it is entirely our responsibility to clear up the Arab world’s self-created mess is still a question I would value readers’ opinions on."

Some great comments too after the article.
 
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