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How Can The Universe Expand Faster Than The Speed Of Light


Science & Tech  (tags: speed of light, General Relativity, special theory of relativity )

Fiona
- 1103 days ago - space.com
Tricky question? Is it generally relative or specially relative? Read on. Please note, comment, forward.



   

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Fiona O (562)
Wednesday July 6, 2016, 5:46 pm
As dark matter causes the universe to expand ever-faster, it may spur some very distant galaxies to apparently move faster than the speed of light. This Hubble Deep Field Image shows some of the most distant galaxies ever observed.

How can the universe expand faster than light travels?

It seems like it should be illegal, doesn’t it? Over and over (and over and over) we're told the supreme iron law of the universe: Nothing — absolutely nothing — can go faster than the speed of light. Done. Nothing further needs to be said about the issue.
 

MmAway M (519)
Wednesday July 6, 2016, 8:44 pm
Ok darling my head is spinning trying to think! Good article. Just a part

"It means that if you look at a galaxy 1 megaparsec away, it will appear to be receding away from us at 68 km/s. If you look at a galaxy 2 megaparsec away, it recedes at 136 km/s. Three megaparsec away? You got it! 204 km/s. And on and on: for every megaparsec, you can add 68 km/s to the velocity of the far-away galaxy."

More at site this technology got me here!

Thank you dear Fiona!

 

Past Member (0)
Thursday July 7, 2016, 2:34 pm
Great post, Fiona. Thanks!
 

Lois Jordan (63)
Thursday July 7, 2016, 5:03 pm
Noted. Thanks, Fiona.
Interesting. Stephen Hawking had a short series on PBS and tried to explain this. So, I'm trying to catch on.
 

Fiona O (562)
Thursday July 7, 2016, 6:46 pm
Well I also sent this to my exhusband, scientist, college professor and Ph.D. type'

And received this answer:

This is a great example of scientific big pants trying to arbitrate. They have forgotten the scientific principle, which is to form a hypothesis, test it repeatedly and get others to test it, and if it fails, to form a new hypothesis. People have worried for a while about things that must go faster than the speed of light, and the weird mathematical proposition of worm holes is quite unsatisfactory in not bringing with it any understanding.

They cling jealously to old hypotheses because they don't know what NEW hypothesis to make. The limiting speed of the speed of light is rock solid according to the mathematics of Albert Einstein, but that doesn't make it right. It's the best hypothesis anybody has had but nobody has found a better one. And scientists just HATE to say WE DON'T KNOW ! It's all nuts, and we've learned enough to see that we can NOT keep up with what Nature throws at us.

Dark matter, dark energy, and to an extent even black holes and the big bang are all sub-hypotheses added onto Einstein's work, or mathematical implications of his work. Einstein's achievement was very broad, so experiments will just support or not support tiny pieces of it. So they spend a bunch of money, come up with a favorable report, and say "That does it".

In their heart of hearts they know that science is nver done. Essentially the whole picture is illustrated by weather. The fact is that repeated experiments CAST DOUBT on their little humanoid conceptions and really indicate we can't predict much of anything because we don't know much of anything. There are scientific facts when it comes to observations (like, yes, Jupiter does have moons) but there are no scientific facts when it comes to pictures of causality and being sure we know what's going on. Newton was great, and Einstein improved the situation, but there are never final answers. That is why I am excited about the Electric Universe. A whole bunch more things "figured out", attendant with another batch of mysteries.

Suspicious Observers is trying to get federal officials to recognize that astounding observations indicate that earthquakes are usually caused by magnetic coupling with the sun through solar outbursts. They are highly placed politically and don't want to make a public mistake, so they say nothing. It is outrageous, and no one is saying he or she understands the link, but the correlation cannot be ignored. They just can't quite get it up to say, "We really don't know what the hell is going on." The scientists are afraid they'll look like an indecisive general.

I see a sort of proportion: The military-industrial complex is to the military as engineering is to science. Part of engineering is knowing what will happen and part of (real) science is knowing we don't know what will happen.

If "c" (speed of light) were really fixed at it's normal value, how in the devil do extraterrestrials, who have demonstrated their mortality, get here from places a hundred light-years away, or possibly vastly farther? There seems to be something real about time-travel, of all forms, including Shamanic, but no one has any credible hypotheses for it.

It's all beautifully humbling, and that's the part the officials hate.
 

Past Member (0)
Thursday July 7, 2016, 8:00 pm
Thanks Fiona...

Interesting article, but frankly your ex-husband's comments are more interesting!

"People have worried for a while about things that must go faster than the speed of light, and the weird mathematical proposition of worm holes is quite unsatisfactory in not bringing with it any understanding."

Yes, a small crowd of 'faster than light-ers' are out there in the scientific community. The inner movement/s of all consciousness is faster than the speed of light....to me.

"The fact is that repeated experiments CAST DOUBT on their little humanoid conceptions and really indicate we can't predict much of anything because we don't know much of anything. There are scientific facts when it comes to observations (like, yes, Jupiter does have moons) but there are no scientific facts when it comes to pictures of causality and being sure we know what's going on."

I love it!...how is it that anything exists?......it's so exciting!

 

Colleen L (3)
Thursday July 7, 2016, 11:24 pm
Interesting. Thanks Fiona
 

Lois Jordan (63)
Saturday July 9, 2016, 5:17 pm
Thanks for the additional comments, Fiona. Quite interesting!
 
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