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Overcome Your Stress By Seeing The Joy Of Others....An Article About Becoming The Change 11/21/2017


Offbeat  (tags: Kelly McGonigal, Carlos Santana, Change, Joy, Stress, health, humans, interesting, news, odd, off-beat, unusual, world )

Fiona
- 302 days ago - dailygood.org
If youâEUR(TM)re feeling stressed or overwhelmed, donâEUR(TM)t cut yourself off from other people, says Kelly McGonigal. Instead, double down on your capacity for connection..



   

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Fiona O (561)
Tuesday November 21, 2017, 5:23 am
One evening when I walked into a classroom to teach my Science of Stress course, I found a newspaper waiting for me on the lectern. A student had brought in an article called “Stress: It’s Contagious.” The report claimed that stress is “as contagious as any airborne pathogen” and compared its toxicity to secondhand smoke.

As an example, the news story described a study showing that participants had an empathic physiological stress response when they observed another person struggling. One of the researchers commented, “It was surprising how easily the stress was transmitted.”

As someone who studies both stress and empathy, I get asked about this research a lot. Does it mean that empathy is a liability, increasing your risk of exhaustion, depression, or burnout? If you are highly empathic, are you doomed to become a reservoir for other people’s pain and suffering?

One solution is to create stronger emotional barriers—to put on a psychological Hazmat suit to protect against the stress and suffering you don’t want to catch. I’ve seen this approach adopted by many people in the helping professions, including health care, social work, and teaching.

If you are feeling similarly overwhelmed by how affected you are by the emotions of others, I’d like to offer another possibility for preserving your well-being: Double down on your capacity for empathy. Instead of trying to become immune to other people’s stress, increase your susceptibility to catch other people’s joy.

The benefits of positive empathy

While modern psychological science has largely focused on empathy for negative states, a new field of research dubbed “positive empathy” shows that it is also possible to catch happiness.
 

. (0)
Tuesday November 21, 2017, 5:25 am
Thanks Fiona,👼🙋
 

Fiona O (561)
Tuesday November 21, 2017, 5:26 am
You might have seen studies showing that seeing other people in pain can activate the pain system in your own brain. It turns out your brain will also resonate with positive emotions. For example, when you witness other’s good fortune, it can activate the brain’s reward system. Moreover, this kind of contagious happiness can be an important source of well-being. The tendency to experience positive empathy is linked to greater life satisfaction, peace of mind, and happiness. It is also associated with greater trust, support, and satisfaction in close relationships.

Those around you may benefit from your empathic joy, as well. One study examined the experience of empathic joy in teachers in fourteen different U.S. states. The teachers who had more frequent experiences of positive empathy toward their students felt more connected to them. This positive attitude led to more positive interactions with students, as observed by classroom evaluators, and higher academic achievement by their students.

Importantly, positive empathy doesn’t just make you feel good; it can also inspire you to do good. The tendency to feel empathic joy is associated with a stronger desire to help others thrive, and a greater willingness to take action to do so. Positive empathy also enhances the warm glow you feel from helping others—making compassion much more sustainable.

Search for small moments of joy

Joy is a big-sounding word, and so we tend to look for classic expressions of “big” joy—huge smiles, exclamations of delight, hugs and cheers. The kind of joy associated with winning the lottery and marriage proposals.

Yet other forms of joy exist all around us. As you begin to look for joy, you will notice more and more of them. There is the joy of pleasures, simple or sublime, such as enjoying a delicious meal, listening to music, or savoring how it feels to hold a baby in your arms. There is the joy of purpose, and how it feels to contribute, work hard, learn, and grow. There is the joy of being connected to something bigger than yourself, be it nature, family, or faith. There is the joy of wonder—being curious, experiencing new things, and feeling awe or surprise.

Quite a bit more on this article about "positive empathy" on site.

This article beautifully proves this wonderful quotation from Carlos Santana:

"If you carry joy in your heart, you can heal every moment." --Carlos Santana

Please note, comment, and forward.

If you will be celebrating "Thanksgiving tomorrow" be blessed with greater joy.
 

Leo Custer (315)
Tuesday November 21, 2017, 7:10 am
thank you for sharing!
 

Colleen L (3)
Tuesday November 21, 2017, 11:24 am
Good information.I believe in being positive. Even when something gets doesn't end up being the way I want, I don't get mad, it just makes me want to try even harder. Plus another way I see positive working is Think how the elderly gets when they have children visit and want to play. You see them glow with such joy and happiness. Thanks Fiona
 

Danuta W (1251)
Wednesday November 22, 2017, 3:38 am
noted
 

Peggy B (43)
Wednesday November 22, 2017, 3:53 am
TYFS
 

Jerome S (0)
Wednesday November 22, 2017, 5:50 am
thanks for sharing
 

Jim V (0)
Wednesday November 22, 2017, 6:21 am
thanks
 
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