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"Terse Tuesday Tidbits March 29, 2016"


US Politics & Gov't  (tags: abuse, americans, ethics, racism, bias, prejudice, discrimination, freedoms, usa, cover-up )

JL
- 1210 days ago - politicsplus.org
A Post to TomCats blog on bigotry, related issues, tools to respond to it when it happens in various areas of our lives instead of condoning or allowing by our silence



   

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Comments

Rose Becke (141)
Monday March 28, 2016, 7:49 pm
Those links are great
 

Edith B (146)
Monday March 28, 2016, 8:53 pm
No Place for Hate: I loved this and shared it on Facebook.

Wildhunt: I didn't know what to make of this one. I had no idea there was an organization for Heathens. That is what my mother called us when we misbehaved.

On Being Good: I can relate to this one. Being good is my sister's job and she works very hard at it, to the extent that she exhausts herself in the process. I was older than her, but always the challenging kid who never knew when to keep her mouth shut.

Psychology Today: I know very few people who are not biased in some way.

Responding to Everyday Bigotry: It is sometimes very difficult to call out a person for their bigotry, and sad to say, I will ignore it if I know it will do no good to argue. I am lucky that my best friend does not have a bigoted bone in her body and we freely talk about how we can handle things. If it is someone I really care about I will tell them how I feel, otherwise, I let it go.

Wikipedia: I never knew that "nippy" came from that source.

Thanks, Judi, this post took a lot of work.


No Place for Hate: I loved this and shared it on Facebook.

Wildhunt: I didn't know what to make of this one. I had no idea there was an organization for Heathens. That is what my mother called us when we misbehaved.

On Being Good: I can relate to this one. Being good is my sister's job and she works very hard at it, to the extent that she exhausts herself in the process. I was older than her, but always the challenging kid who never knew when to keep her mouth shut.

Psychology Today: I know very few people who are not biased in some way.

Responding to Everyday Bigotry: It is sometimes very difficult to call out a person for their bigotry, and sad to say, I will ignore it if I know it will do no good to argue. I am lucky that my best friend does not have a bigoted bone in her body and we freely talk about how we can handle things. If it is someone I really care about I will tell them how I feel, otherwise, I let it go.

Wikipedia: I never knew that "nippy" came from that source.

Thanks, Judi, this post took a lot of work.






 

Joanne Dixon (37)
Monday March 28, 2016, 10:29 pm
"Heathen" is an interesting word. Since it is (and has been for time out of mind) used almost interchangeably with "pagan," which is definitely from the Latin "Paganus" (living in the country, ina rural area) it may refer to people who love "on the heath (uncutivated land)." Or it may not. There are also Gothic and Greek possibilities.

The use of the term "nip" to refer to "a chill in the weather" goes back to 1610. The Etymological Dictionary suggests that referred to its "biting" or "pinching" effect on vegetation. The adjective "nippy" with the same meaning goes back to 1898, and I see that "Nip" as a slur was in use by 1900, so there may well have been some ugly cross-pollination there. I never heard of it, but there are lots of things I've never heard of. [Then, of course, there's "nip" as a measure of srong drink, originally spirits, but it has now descended in the world to include coffee. See Nestle's "Nips" Coffee Candy. Or don't. I got some at a dollar store during an "off" period of the Nestle boycott. They are tasty, actually come in multiple flavors, but can be hard on the teeth.]

As JL points out, what is in the speaker's mind may be irrelevant if a listener is hurt. Look at all the dog-whistles we hear now and how ill mannered they are! And actions may speak much louder than words.
 

Past Member (0)
Monday March 28, 2016, 10:46 pm
I found the best method of getting your husband to bring home Chinese food once a week---serve him "Terse Tuesday Tidbits". Ty. Noted.
 

Animae C (508)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 1:38 am
i've never felt the need to prove myself as anything, people always make their own judgements & they're too often wrong.
Interesting links.

Thanx JL
 

Barbara T (431)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 3:14 am
Since I grew up during WWII, I was very familiar with the term "Nip", derived from "Nippon", as a slur against the Japanese "Enemy". I haven't heard it used outside of a WWII context, tho, that I can recall.
It's a combination of Japanese people AND their country we were at the time, at war against, "Nippon".
I haven't heard it outside the "country" connotation. But I suppose some bigots may have picked it up from there. It was seen in newspaper articles, war novels, and comic books, and soldiers' slang, relating to the time. Like ALL "slang" at the time, it was considered slightly dis-reputable, not for formal speech.

The word "nippy" is an ENTIRELY different word, with no racial connotations WHATSOEVER.
It refers to "Jack Frost" "nipping" fingers, toes and noses during Frosty weather! It is a mere CO-INCIDENCE due to the vagaries of language, that it just HAPPENS to use the same sound!!! Nipping like a small and harmless animal! "Jack Frost" being of course, a Personification of the weather! There was NO suggestion of non-respectability, or something you wouldn't "say in the Best Company"! [It's also, come to think of it, related to its more serious manifestation, "FrostBITE".]

"Nippy" has NEVER, EVER been used as an adjective describing a Japanese! "Nip" is a PROPER NOUN. [Or improper one if you will.]
It is the same case as with the word, "niggardly", meaning stingy or scant. As in "niggardly" possessions, a "niggardly" attitude. Again, an adjective. This word has NOTHING WHATSOEVER to do with any race, or the "n" word! It is a PURE CO-INCIDENCE that SOME of the sounds are alike! I can see how someone would be sensitive, and "jump" at that sound! But, it is a perfectly respectable word with its own etymology, going back centuries...
"Negro" and its derivatives, is from Spanish or Portuguese meaning "Black".... nothing to do with "stingy"!

Wikipedia DOES NOT say that "nippy" the adjective, is a bad word, if you READ it....
 

Barbara T (431)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 3:47 am
Heathens, Pagans, modern followers of Ancient European religions, of Northern Europe, tend to be perceived sometimes as tainted or contaminated by THE NAZIS' VERSION OF ANCIENT "ARYAN" OR GERMANIC RELIGION, which enjoyed a "Revival" during the Third Reich. There are fascinating books, videos and movies if you want to explore this subject.
So, while Ancient Religions of the Northern regions, regarding Ancient Norse Gods such as Thor, Odin and Freya, are being revived in modern times - alongside them, the "okay" versions, are ALSO simultaneously being revived, the Nazi Third Reich versions! Much to the DISMAY of the non-Nazis - and THAT is what is being discussed in that article on "Heathenism".
It is not easy to keep them apart - as the article says that the Nazi types are sneaky, trying to "take over", and DO NOT COME ON AS NAZIS, with Jackboots and Heil Hitler! which would immediately turn people off! But the article points out they use certain "code words"... They are apparently trying to sneakily "infiltrate" the non-Nazi pagans, or to siphon off their younger members for their OWN cult. Music is one of the attractions they use....
The non-Nazi pagans or heathens, want to make it clear that they are committed to Spirituality and Peace, not to Racism in any form, or Skinhead Violence....
 

JL A (281)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 8:36 am
If Asians find nippy offensive, like in my experience, we should honor their view and avoid the term IMO
 

Barbara T (431)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 10:02 am
"It's nippy weather"? I have NEVER heard of ANYone finding that offensive! I would have no qualms about saying it in front of ANYone. The word "Nip", applied to a Japanese, THAT'S offensive.
But "nippy weather" is no more offensive than, "That puppy NIPPED me!" or, you could say that's a "nippy" puppy! Also nobody can misapprehend, "That puppy gave me a NIP!"

The word "niggardly", however, experience has shown it's best avoided on radio, TV, or spoken by anyone in the public eye. It is just too easily "mis-heard" and misunderstood by the general public!
It is a somewhat rare and unnecessary word with lots of perfectly good substitutes. "Niggardly" is only "offensive" if you misapprehend it - but that is too easy to do, and too often actually done.
I would avoid saying the word "niggardly" if giving a speech or interview in public! However, in writing meant to be read by fairly well-educated people, in context it would still be a perfectly good and respectable word to use...
 

JL A (281)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 10:14 am
Perhaps the difference in experience is attributable to how high a population of Asians in CA compared to WA and how many Japanese here lost their property, etc., in WWII...my advice is to listen to those who have been affected, which I will continue to choose to do out of respect for them and their voice of their experience.
 

Barbara T (431)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 10:19 am
"Nippy" MIGHT be a diminutive of "Nip" applied to a Japanese or Asian. THAT context would be offensive!
But it was never used that way, never heard, during WWII.
If "Nippy" and "Nip" are used interchangeably, for Asians, that is a Modern usage I have never yet come across.

"Nip" and "Jap" were used during WWII in newspapers, because "Japanese" was deemed too many words long for a newspaper headline! That was how that started...
"Jap" was a more "respectable" word. "Nip", being more "slangy", would have been used in the tabloid papers and in comic books. I think it was a word you would not use in a classroom, for example, in front of your teacher [manners were more formal, then!]. While "Jap" was a word you might see in a "respectable" newspaper.
 

JL A (281)
Tuesday March 29, 2016, 10:30 am
Given the stereotype of cold(blooded) I can understand their perspective and accept it as guidance for my choices.
 

Pat B (354)
Wednesday March 30, 2016, 7:56 am
No Place for Hate: Very good link, passing this on to others as well.

On being Good: My story is similar to this story, and I have found, being older now, that I am a person unto myself. I don't have to prove anything to anyone about anything anymore, unless I choose otherwise, and I feel better for it. It took many years of abuse growing up, to come to this personal decision. LOVE this quote in the story: "Healing may not be so much about getting better, as about letting go of everything that isn't you - all of the expectations, all of the beliefs - and becoming who you are." --Rachel Naomi Remen.

Speak Up: When I was still working @school, I would canvass the cafeteria or the halls, and just listen to the students. If the student(s) would comment about another, in a derogatory way, we, as a group, would try to get to the root of the problem, by talking to them, letting them know that it's hurtful to the other. I have no problem speaking out to help others. I've spoken out, as I know how it feels, so I'm an advocate against this kind of biased behavior.

Great thought provoking links today, you did a wonderful job on it too!! Thank you, JL for this.
 

Janet B (0)
Wednesday March 30, 2016, 11:56 am
Thanks
 

Judy C (91)
Friday April 1, 2016, 5:25 pm
Because prejudice is absorbed and learned so well through modeling, it's important to look for ways to fight it.

Ryan Smith's article is a good example of recognizing and combating prejudice. It's more insidious when it's hidden, in this case in what might seem like a pretty unexpected place, the pagan and heathen communities. It's understandable that people don't want to confront this issue for reasons that Ryan discusses; however, it's paramount to recognize and root out this poison from the community.

I thought the discussion of metapolitics was very informative. Metapolitics is defined here as the practice of bringing about social change by using nonpolitical means to establish a new dominant cultural frame, also referred to as cultural hegemony. The intent is not to challenge people’s politics but to find other ways to win them over through means like music, art and events organized under the banners of cultural preservation and tradition. This is particularly treacherous, and I'm glad you posted this discussion, Jl.

"On being good" is written by a very wise woman. The story illustrates the delusion that and harm that can result from black-and-white thinking. It's also a good illustration of the harm of favoritism, and also of scapegoating. No one is either all bad or all good, but it's easy to fall into the trap of perceiving people that way.

I'm glad the fourth article deals with accepting bias as a normal, automatic result of the way that we process incoming information. It can be very difficult to see one's own biases. The article talks about parents who try to raise color-blind children. I think this is a mistake for two reasons. One is that it tries to deny the fact that people do indeed belong to different categories. Children are quick to spot something fake, and they are apt to wonder why adults are so busy trying to avoid recognizing people's differing characteristics. The second is the children miss out on appreciation of the richness of ethnic variation, and an appreciation of other differences among people. Bias itself is not the problem, but being unable to recognize it leads to prejudiced actions.

The piece from the SPLC is a great practical guide for how to deal with specific situations regarding prejudice, even including examining one's own thinking for it. I would say that virtually everyone uses at least one kind of stereotype, so-called joke, or slur at one time or another. These figures of speech are used without thinking by so many people, and I think without hateful intent or realization of the possible harm that can be done by such language.The term "nips" is a good illustration of my last point in the preceding paragraph. I'm glad you added this piece, JL., because I didn't even know where this term came from. I remember hearing this term when I was younger, but I had no idea where it came from. I do remember seeing a lot of racism in the early cartoons that we used to see on TV when we were growing up. My parents always spoke out against this when it came up, and I'm glad of that.



 

Judy C (91)
Friday April 1, 2016, 5:35 pm
Oops, the sentence "The term 'nips'" should have begun a new paragraph.
 

Nita L (127)
Friday April 1, 2016, 11:50 pm
Thank you JL. Great articles.
 

Lona G (66)
Saturday April 2, 2016, 8:17 am
Thanks for an exceptionally interesting read, Judi.

I could relate to most, but not quite all of it; cultural differences between Europe and America got in the way, I guess. The most important message from all these articles is that everything starts with awareness. You need to become aware of your own biases, and yes, we all have them, and the fine line where bias crosses over into bigotry before you can make others aware of their biases gone bigot. Otherwise your just a hypocritical bigot and that's even worse in my book.
 

JL A (281)
Saturday April 2, 2016, 8:43 am
Excellent summation Lona!
 
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